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39

Ale yeast strains are best used at temperatures ranging from 10 to 25°C, though some strains will not actively ferment below 12°C (33). Ale yeasts are generally regarded as top-fermenting yeasts since they rise to the surface during fermentation, creating a very thick, rich yeast head. That is why the term "top-fermenting" is associated with ale yeasts. ...


17

A pictty good summary: (Source: BeerSci: What Is The Difference Between A Lager And An Ale?) The first part of the picture depicts the description in my answer about where the yeast "works," the temperatures at which they work, and then some common types of ales/lagers. The second picture shows S. cerevisiae (common ale yeast) and a wild yeast S. ...


12

This is pretty good explanation Source: Twenty Things Worth Knowing About Beer.


11

It's historical. The "Pale" in Pale Ale is mostly historical. In the 18th century, most beers were dark due to being produced with barley malt that was kilned or roasted over wood fires. But from England emerged a new technique using pale malts, cured in coke-fuelled kilns. This applied to both ales and lagers, resulting in beers that were bronze, copper or ...


9

First, a disclaimer: I'm American and most of my knowledge of craft beer comes from the American beer scene. I am somewhat aware of the evolution of the UK brewing industry, but nowhere near as knowledgeable as I am about America's. Now, definitions. Craft Beer commonly derives the Brewer's Association definition of a Craft Brewer. Which is Small, ...


7

Bitters are ales; the English term bitter is generally equivalent to pale ale. Pale ales are made from pale malt and many types are heavily hopped. The term bitter refers to the bitterness inherent in their hoppy character when compared to other beers like stouts and porters. Note that like many beer terms, taxonomy is not hard and fast, e.g. a blonde ...


7

Technically, yes. The actual answer has more to do with yeast content than carbonation. Unfiltered beers like real ale have much more yeast in suspension, and yeast has a tendency to make you gassy when digested. Lager in general has very little yeast due to the long, cold, aging process. I believe commercial examples are filtered as well. In general ...


7

Like many beer terms, "session beer" is not rigorously defined. Several groups have tried, though: The Brewers Association (PDF) called it 4.0-5.1% ABV Beer Advocate calls it less than 5% The Session Beer Project calls it 4.5%. Really, though, if you call something a session beer, most people will understand that to mean something you could easily drink ...


6

The American Pale Ale (also known as APA) is normally a light-colored ale that is traditionally hoppy with light malt flavor. But its formal description is a little bit more flexible. It's defined as a very balanced style. It originates from the English Pale Ales. The BJCP describes it as the following (short version): Aroma: Moderate to strong hop. ...


5

Ales and lagers are brewed with different types of yeast. Ale yeast ferments at the top of the brewing vat at a comfortable room temperature while lager yeast ferments at the bottom of the vat at a lower temperature. The "low and slow" lager fermentation brings out more complex flavors.


5

Beers (ales and lagers) are broken down into many, many different styles based on how they are brewed. Most beers have only 3 or 4 different types of ingredients. Malt, water, yeast, hops and sometimes fruit or herbs. While there doesn't seem like there can be a lot of variation, there are almost an infinite amount of ways to combine these ingredients. For ...


4

Why is it that some beers are served Cold and why are some served Warm? At what temperature should a beer be served can be answered by the following statement: Most beers have an ideal serving temperature. There’s a chart below outlining which styles are served at what temperature, but as a general rule the temperature at which to serve a beer is ...


4

I don't think anyone would deliberately or professionally serve warm beer, if by warm you mean something close to body temperature. Generally speaking, cask ale (as opposed to pressurised keg beer) is served, in the UK at least, and according to CAMRA's website, at cellar temperature: 12-14 C (54-57 F), whereas lager and keg beer is usually served much ...


3

If you're in the South West, then it's definitely worth checking out Otter Brewery (a really good range with a cracking bitter). Also Abbey Ales are the only ales actually brewed in Bath, not to say that Bath Ales aren't great, but this is real Bath ale! Depending how far SW you go, Exeter Brewery's Avocet Ale is a nice drop that you can have a really good ...


3

The primary difference is the yeast used to ferment the beer -- ales use yeasts strains which work at a warmer temperature (10-25 deg C) than lager yeasts strains (7-15 deg C). You may hear the terms "top-fermenting" for ale yeasts and "bottom-fermenting" for lagers, but I think that's more-or-less happen-stance -- the yeasts themselves are not inclined ...


3

A pale ale is traditionally an ale that is is brewed predominantly with pale malt and is hop forward. Brewers often add additional malts in order to achieve whatever it is that they're specifically trying to achieve for a given beer, and a pale ale with some caramel or crystal malt will indeed have a darker coloration though on the whole the properties of ...


3

That is possible to a level, but not proven, and probably does not make a huge difference, as there are many factors causing hangover, some stronger than others. Moreover, that would be saying that all commercial beers have the same effects and all local brewed ales have the same other (better) effect, which sounds to me very simple and convenient to ...


3

São Paulo has seen a big rise in the craft beer scene through the last years (as does the whole country), so you'll probably find what you're looking for. The city doesn't have an actual (physical) brewery of its own (besides brewpubs, which are only a few, the most relevant being Cervejaria Nacional), once most of them are in the countryside of São Paulo ...


2

I've been to Cervejeria Nacional, which makes some good brews: http://www.cervejarianacional.com.br/ I found this list of breweries in SP state, including SP city: http://beerme.com/region.php?411 While there might not be a ton of breweries in SP, craft beer bars can be found popping up all over.


2

I brew in South Florida with similar ambient temps during the spring-summer-autumn. For beer styles, check out the saison, which enjoys a higher fermentation temperature. Wyeast 3724 has a temperature range of 70-95F, 21-35C and attenuates up to 80%. I've had great success with this strain, even at the higher ends of the range. Beer and Wine Journal has a ...


2

That is really too warm as you will get fusel oils as a bi-product. If you absolutely must do it in that high of a temperature, I would go with an ESB or something. If you really are going to get into this, you may want to invest in an old refrigerator and maintain around 17 - 20 degrees for an ale. Well worth the investment if you have the space and ...


2

Doing the math out, assuming my liters to US Gallons conversion by Google is accurate, that would come out to around 1.6-1.7 volumes of CO2 in the beer which is on the lower end of carbonation but probably appropriate for many European ale styles. Think of something like a Bitter or ESB, that's probably where you'll end up. Caster sugar is just very fine ...


2

My research suggests that Capilano Pale Ale is no longer brewed. This Vancouver Archives article on beer in Vancouver suggests that the Capilano brewery was taken over by Molson in 1958. Searching the address given (1550 Burrard Street), I found that Molson still occupies the space. Very little else comes up when I search for Capilano Brewery or Capilano ...


2

Yes, they contain adjuncts which aren't malted barley to make them cheaper to produce. These adjuncts aren't the same type of sugar so are fermented differently than maltose.


2

If you're really willing to push your own limits, try The Wild's sour/wild beers. I became aware of them last year completely by accident, in a trip to UK, and loved their Modus Operandi beer. I also had another very light pale sour wich wasn't remarkable compared to the first one, but fairly ok. (I guess it probably should have had more time in the bottle ...


2

Have you tried Wickwar Brewery? http://www.wickwarbrewing.co.uk If you like darker beers the Station Porter is one of the best I have ever tasted. Its got a great brewery shop and I well worth a visit.


1

Not a great answer since I have no specifics for you. Going out to local bars and stores selling beer and shopping around can find you stuff, but it's expensive. Though if you're lucky someone might be at one of these places to help you. Another avenue might be to use something like beeradvocate.com, ratebeer.com or untappd.com to get recommendations ...


1

This does indeed happen to me, too. So I stopped drinking beer where the ingredients aren't listed or if I think the beer is likely to contain GMO. Call me a tree hugger I don't care;-) I remember reading the head aches may come from fusel oils, which are byproducts of fermentation. Depending on the ingredients there may be more or less of them. I remember ...


1

The main difference between the two is the different types of yeast that they both use. Lager yeasts are more tolerant to cold temperatures and so are fermented at a lower temperature. This is what gives the lager a crisp flavour. The ale yeasts ferment at higher temperatures and take less time to complete as the yeast is more active the higher the ...


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