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11

tl;dr — By regulation, ±0.3-0.5%. Chemically speaking, I'm not sure—maybe someone else can go into measuring techniques, alterations (continued fermentation?) during distribution, etc. But countries and regions specify tolerances for error. In the United States, according to Title 27: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, Part 7: Labeling and Advertising ...


9

Primarily through the use of freeze distillation. After the beer is brewed, using the normal process, the temperature is brought down below the freezing point of water, but above the freezing point of alcohol, so some portion of the water in the beer freezes into ice and can then be removed. What remains has a far higher concentration of alcohol than what ...


8

Historically small beer is believed to be between 2 and 3.5% ABV, based on notes from Belgian monasteries which produced small beer from the 3rd runnings of the mash and original French Saison recipes. Those numbers are probably accurate for brewing between the middle ages and about the 1500s. Small beer got a little stronger a few hundred years later when ...


8

Highly unlikely that the alcohol went up. Four reasons. The alcohol already in the wine is a barrier for the yeast to re-ferment. The sulfites in the wine could inhibit refermentation if it hasn't dissipated yet. The cold temperatures that will also inhibit fermentation. Many commercial wines are sterile filtered so yeast counts are zero to very, very ...


7

It's pretty unlikely. Given that it was a commercial wine I don't there was much live, viable yeast in the bottle. Particularly if sulfites were added, triggering additional fermentation would probably be difficult. On top of that, refrigerating it for the whole 24 hours means that, even if there was viable yeast uninhibited by sulfites, it's very unlikely ...


7

Like many beer terms, "session beer" is not rigorously defined. Several groups have tried, though: The Brewers Association (PDF) called it 4.0-5.1% ABV Beer Advocate calls it less than 5% The Session Beer Project calls it 4.5%. Really, though, if you call something a session beer, most people will understand that to mean something you could easily drink ...


6

There are two ways a brewery can measure the abv: By wort gravity: by measuring the specific gravity of the wort (the sugar solution that the yeast ferment into beer) both before and after fermentation. The difference is the amount of sugar consumed, which can be used to approximate the amount of alcohol produced. By distillation: the sample is heated, so ...


5

There is indeed a EU Regulation No 110/2008 about "the definition, description, presentation, labelling and the protection of geographical indications of spirit drinks" which prescribes the minimal ABV for different spirits and it happens to be about 40%. So the minimum alcoholic strength by volume of rum shall be 37,5 %. the minimum alcoholic strength by ...


5

No, federal malt beverage labeling laws make it optional (though they do describe standards the label must meet if brewers do choose to add the alcohol content label.) State laws, however, may require a brewer to add alcohol content to the label. Clearly Delaware law (where Dogfish Head is based) must not. In my experience, this is not terribly ...


3

Any beer is only as good as the brewer's skills. In London (UK) we have a brewery producing a 2.8% abv beer (Redemption brewery, beer name escapes me) which is packed with hops and of greater hop depth than many IPAs. Batches of a beer that are brewed to be low alcohol will necessarily be different to those brewed at full strength which is why I would hope (...


3

You're speaking of Utah, I assume, the only state I've been to that has laws like that. I know you can achieve lower alcohol content by using less yeast, or sugar, or both, since alcohol in beer is produced by the fermentation process of yeast turning sugar into alcohol. I would guess this is primarily how it's done, but there could be other (post-...


2

Bluepoint Brewery of Long Island NY makes Old Howling Bastard at 10% ABV (though I won't buy their beer anymore as they just sold to InBev a few weeks ago) Dirtwolf from Victory Brewing Company of Pennsylvania at 8.7% ABV At 9% ABV, you've got Double Simcoe from Weyerbacher Brewing Co of Pennsylvania Out of NY, you have Unearthly from Southern Tier, rolling ...


2

Aging, from my experience, involves the heavy proteins settling to the bottom of the bottle. Filtered beer typically doesn't need to be aged because all of that is already removed. You can consider this "pre aged" like a shirt may be "pre shrunk". Best not to buy with the assumption that it will get any smaller (or improve with time). Much of the time, ...


1

The feeling of alcoholicity, at tasting, is very dependant of many factors, such as temperature of beverage, sugar, glycerol and a few other molecules content, and of course personal abilities of the taster as well as the preceeding tastings. Concerning the present situtation, a simple experiment is a comparative tasting : keeping two glasses of the same ...


1

Number 3 and number 4 in your list is actually getting its high ABV by adding pure ethanol. The brewery didn't admit this at first, but eventually they admitted to be adding ethanol to get the high ABVs. Sadly, I can't find the blog post where they admit this at the moment.


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