Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 37

Questions about flavor and how it is influenced by various factors such as temperature and glassware.

4
votes
Common causes for a metallic taste are dissolved metals such as iron or copper, either from the water supply or brewing equipment, or due to the oxidation of fat molecules which can bind with metals … . Personally though, I find that I can regularly taste metal in the finish of any of a variety of beers that are over-chilled. I don't recall Belgians being particularly an issue (but I love …
answered Mar 23 '15 by Xander
4
votes
I'd start an introduction to sour, or wild ales with the more approachable Lambics, like Lindemans Framboise Lambic. With a beer like that, the sour notes from the wild yeast are offset by the sweet …
answered May 16 '14 by Xander
6
votes
What you're most likely to find everyday are not beers that are flat, exactly, but are very low in carbonation. Barleywine ale is one of these styles, and though it will typically have some carbonat …
answered Feb 15 '14 by Xander
10
votes
First, to clear up the myth. European beer is not served warm. Some beers, such as real ale (or cask ale) are served at cellar temperature, which while certainly above the temperature of a beer fre …
answered Feb 13 '14 by Xander
4
votes
Tasting Beer by Randy Mosher is by far the most valuable beer book I've ever read. It covers the styles you'll encounter, the flavors, the technology, the history, the science, and more. I was a fai …
answered Feb 6 '14 by Xander