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It is in general better for aging to store wine bottles horizontally (or close to) than vertically. There are exceptions though.

But what to do if wines have been stored for 5 or more years vertically in a cellar and if we want to move them to an horizontal storage position?

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    "It is in general better for aging to store wine bottles vertically (or close to) than horizontally" Do you have a source? To my knowledge, it is better to store wine horizontally to keep the cork moist and prevent it from drying out.
    – d4zed
    Commented Aug 31, 2023 at 8:04
  • @d4zed That is a perfectly good answer. Please post it as one.
    – Eric S
    Commented Aug 31, 2023 at 16:51
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    @d4zed i switched vertically and horizontally, it's stupid. I edit the question now
    – Olórin
    Commented Aug 31, 2023 at 19:30

1 Answer 1

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Storing wine bottles horizontally is the preferred method for long-term aging because it keeps the cork moist and in contact with the wine. This helps to prevent the cork from drying out, which can lead to oxidation.

Before making any changes, carefully inspect each bottle for any visible issues. Check for signs of leakage, unnatural color, cork protrusion, or cork deterioration. If you don't notice any problems, you can proceed.

Transitioning wine from vertical to horizontal storage should not have a negative impact on the wine, especially if it's done carefully and the bottles are in good condition. Once moved, the bottles should be monitored more often than usual, especially for sings of leakage.

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    Storing wine bottles horizontally is the preferred method for long-term aging because it keeps the cork moist and in contact with the wine. This was true when corks were made of cork. But now that most corks are not made of cork (AFAIK), is it still true? Commented Sep 20, 2023 at 7:30
  • As of 2023, most corks are still made of natural cork, especially in the long-aging range. Natural corks allow producers to monitor the wine and act if necessary, read ReCorking Clinics. This of course could change in the future as technology progresses
    – TeslaZap
    Commented Oct 19, 2023 at 6:14
  • Thank you. I did not know that most corks are still (2023) made of natural cork. I had read, about 15+ years ago, there was a shift to synthetic cork, and I figured most had shifted by now. Commented Oct 19, 2023 at 6:49
  • being the screw cap mostly used in low end volume wines, its absolute usage count could be high or even higher than natural cork, but not in the scope of this question (yet?)
    – TeslaZap
    Commented Oct 20, 2023 at 7:19
  • What I recall reading (it was 15+ years ago, so my recollection probably won't be perfect!) was about replacing natural cork with synthetic corks. I think the reason was due to how natural cork was/is obtained. Cost may have been a factor too. They were talking about switching to synthetic corks, but it's possible some switched to screw caps (although it seems unlikely). From what you're saying, it sounds more like they remained with natural corks. Maybe I'll research to see what happened over the past 15+ years since I read about it. Thanks again for letting me know about current practices. Commented Oct 20, 2023 at 8:24

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