1

You could just keep your vodka/gin in the freezer, and mix it with vermouth. Why do people bother with the ice when making a martini? Ice just waters it down -- and if you do wish to dilute your drink, you can just add water to it.

4
  • Does this answer your question? Dry Martini or cold gin?
    – d4zed
    Sep 19 at 20:25
  • @d4zed This question is about ice though, not how little vermouth you can use and still call it a "martini".
    – MWB
    Sep 19 at 22:18
  • 1
    The water, that is melted while stirring, is quite an important part of making a good Dry Martini. It helps smoothen the alcohol and changes the texture of the cocktail (alcohol, water and the mixture of both has a different viscosity)
    – d4zed
    Sep 19 at 22:40
  • @d4zed Your comment is an adequate answer. You should post it as such.
    – Eric S
    Sep 20 at 17:48
4

The water, that is melted while stirring, is quite an important part of making a good Dry Martini. It helps smoothen the alcohol and changes the texture of the cocktail (alcohol, water and the mixture of both has a different viscosity)

5
  • You could just add water.
    – MWB
    Sep 21 at 6:10
  • Well it wouldn't be cold, then. If you put gin and vermouth in the freezer beforehand, you could just add water, yes. Probably the most unromantic Martini ever.
    – d4zed
    Sep 21 at 7:03
  • 1
    I think your last comment is relevant. The process of making a martini is part of the appeal, especially if shaken.
    – Eric S
    Sep 21 at 14:48
  • @EricS So the whole thing with the ice is just for show... d4zed Maybe you should've put that in the answer.
    – MWB
    Sep 22 at 18:29
  • @bobcat Seems like a good time to try an experiment. Try making with and without ice and report back with your impressions.
    – Eric S
    Sep 22 at 19:39

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