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How much of an impact do yeasts strains have on their [beer] products? Is this a significant game changer?

I want to craft delicious fermented foods. Beer, bread and pizza are a few of my motives.

I have various (German) beers I absolutely love that I would like to propagate a culture of yeast from to make these foods and beverages. With the impression that these tasty beer's yeast cultures could be a factor that would reflect in the tastiness of these products.

My concerns are how much of a difference propagating such yeast strains are VS. other factors of the product's various ingredients. Mainly, Will I notice a big difference in the individual yeast cultures alone, aside from the other ingredient factors? Or does it not matter as much as the other ingredients?

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    This question may get more traction on the Homebrew SE site.
    – Eric S
    Aug 30 at 15:33
  • Ahh I've yet to discover, till now... thanks for the direction.
    – mrSidX
    Aug 31 at 22:01
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Yeast can change everything in a beer.

The french brewery le père l'amer released 2 beers (or 4) on which they brewed one batch of beer, splitted it in 2 and put one yeast on the first part and an other yeast on the second.

This made 2 beers who looked, smelled and tasted completely differently (and they did not have the same percentage of alcohol too).

Here they are on untappd :

yeast battle #1 verdant VS yeast battle #1 WLP644

yeast battle #2 dry english VS yeast battle #2 london fog

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  • Good answer but did you mean to highlight "le père l'amer" or provide a link. A link would be more useful.
    – Eric S
    Sep 4 at 15:47
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    @Eric s this was just an example I know that proved that just changing the yeast cam change everything. I put untappd links so you van see via the photos and the comments how different the beer are with just the yeast being changed.
    – f222
    Sep 4 at 17:06

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