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I've already done some research and from what I understand, in the fining phase agents such as fish bladders or egg whites are used to group together the debris in the wine. This makes filtering them out easier. So in theory the fining agents should get removed in the filtration process too. But some may get missed. So a wine that advertises itself as vegan or vegetarian used an alternative to fining agent? Do some vegan wines simply skip the fining phase, or do all wines go through fining?

Is it more of a marketing thing to call a wine vegan since realistically most already are?

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So a wine that advertises itself as vegan or vegetarian used an alternative to fining agent?

That's true. There are alternatives to the use animal products for fining. Examples are clay, silica and vegetable plaque.

Do some vegan wines simply skip the fining phase, or do all wines go through fining?

There are a lot of wine makers that prefer not to fine their wines. Not necessarily because they are animal friendly, but because they believe this process deprives the natural flavour and texture. Those wines are often called "natural wine".

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  • My understanding is that natural wine is more about avoiding pesticides and such: en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_wine – Eric S Sep 8 '20 at 13:51
  • Merely avoiding pesticides would make the wine organic. There is no strict definition for what a 'natural' wine is - but it often involves spontaneous fermentation and not adding sulphur – morsor Sep 9 '20 at 6:21

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