20

When going out for some beers, after a while, I seem to pee more than the amount of beer I drink. Is that true, and why is that?

enter image description here

  • 4
    This question appears to be off-topic because it is about biology rather than beer. – wax eagle Jan 21 '14 at 20:52
  • 8
    Obviously, you should pee into the empty beer bottles to check this theory. – Der Hochstapler Jan 21 '14 at 20:55
  • 1
    I really hope you're not actually peeing beer. – Tom Medley Jan 21 '14 at 21:15
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    @waxeagle, I'd put this squarely in the middle of the beer/biology interest diagram. Assuming we have sufficient expertise to answer it here, it's relevance to the beer-drinking audience makes me think it's on-topic. – Jaydles Jan 21 '14 at 21:24
26

Alcohol is a diuretic. According to this article, 1 gram of alcohol will increase urine excretion by 10ml. Combine that with this CDC article stating that a standard 12 ounce (354ml) beer has 14 grams of alcohol, your can expect to pee 494ml, or 16.75 ounces per 12 ounce bottle.

The graphic would be more accurate with you drinking three beers but peeing four.

  • This raises the importance of staying properly hydrated while drinking alcohol; the beer more you drink, the more dehydrated you're going to get. – Anthony Jan 21 '14 at 22:58
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    it specifically decreases the production of ADH hormone en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasopressin – Arthur D Feb 6 '16 at 0:29
3

Because beer is 95% water! Yes alcohol is a diuretic but if delivered with all this water, it is actually hydrating. If you would drink these huge glasses full of water you would urinate fearsomely as well.

So the best news ever is: beer is hydrating. There is scientific evidence for it here from 4:14 onwards. All before that is about the benefits of drinking water, yeah yeah.

enter image description here

  • Great answer on aviation and here. I will accept that answer as soon as I am off Suspension. – Muze the good Troll. May 12 at 16:17

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